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What Are the Different Types of Diabetes?

Causes

Symptoms

Incidence

Complications

Treatment

Prevention

Outlook

 

What are the different types of diabetes?


Diabetes is a group of diseases in which the body doesn’t produce enough or any insulin, doesn’t properly use the insulin that is produced, or exhibits a combination of both. When any of these things happens, the body is unable to get sugar from the blood into the cells. That leads to high blood sugar levels.


Glucose, the form of sugar found in your blood, is one of your main energy sources. A lack of insulin or resistance to insulin causes sugar to build up in your blood. This can lead to many health problems.


The three main types of diabetes are:


  1. type 1 diabetes
  2. type 2 diabetes
  3. gestational diabetes

 

What causes diabetes?

 

 

1. Type 1 diabetes

 

Type 1 diabetes is believed to be an autoimmune condition. This means your immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys the beta cells in your pancreas that produce insulin. The damage is permanent.


What prompts the attacks isn’t clear. There may be both genetic and environmental reasons. Lifestyle factors aren’t thought to play a role.

 

2. Type 2 diabetes

 

 

Type 2 diabetes starts as insulin resistance. This means your body can’t use insulin efficiently. That stimulates your pancreas to produce more insulin until it can no longer keep up with demand. Insulin production decreases, which leads to high blood sugar.


The exact cause of type 2 diabetes is unknown. Contributing factors may include:


genetics

lack of exercise

being overweight

There may also be other health factors and environmental reasons.


Gestational diabetes

Gestational diabetes is due to insulin-blocking hormones produced during pregnancy. This type of diabetes only occurs during pregnancy.


What are the symptoms?

General symptoms of diabetes include:


excessive thirst and hunger

frequent urination

drowsiness or fatigue

dry, itchy skin

blurry vision

slow-healing wounds

Type 2 diabetes can cause dark patches in the folds of skin in your armpits and neck. Since type 2 diabetes often takes longer to diagnose, you may feel symptoms at the time of diagnosis, like pain or numbness in your feet.


Type 1 diabetes often develops more quickly and can cause symptoms like weight loss or a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when you have very high blood sugars, but little or no insulin in your body.


Symptoms of both types of diabetes can appear at any age, but generally type 1 occurs in children and young adults. Type 2 occurs in people over the age of 45. But younger people are increasingly being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes due to sedentary lifestyles and an increase in weight.




How common is diabetes?

About 30.3 millionTrusted Source people in the United States have diabetes. About 5 to 10Trusted Source percent have type 1 diabetes, while 90 to 95 percent have type 2 diabetes.


The latest figures show that 1.5 million adultsTrusted Source were newly diagnosed in 2015. Another 84.1 million are thought to have prediabetes. But most people with prediabetes don’t know they have the condition.


Prediabetes occurs when your blood glucose is higher than it should be, but not high enough to be diabetes.


You’re more likely to develop diabetes if you have a family history of the disease.


Other risk factors for type 2 diabetes include:


having a sedentary lifestyle

being overweight

having had gestational diabetes or prediabetes

 


What are the potential complications?

Complications of diabetes generally develop over time. Having poorly controlled blood sugar levels increases the risk of serious complications that can become life-threatening. Chronic complications include:


vessel disease, leading to heart attack or stroke

eye problems, called retinopathy

infection or skin conditions

nerve damage, or neuropathy

kidney damage, or nephropathy

amputations due to neuropathy or vessel disease

Type 2 diabetes may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, especially if your blood sugar is not well controlled.


Complications in pregnancy

High blood sugar levels during pregnancy can harm mother and child, increasing the risk of:


high blood pressure

preeclampsia

miscarriage or stillbirth

birth defects

HEALTHLINE RESOURCE

Nutritional diabetes guidance

Our weekly micro-lessons can empower you with wisdom you need to make healthy changes for your diabetes. Short and easy to follow tips for the week ahead.


Enter your email

Your privacy is important to us


How are different types of diabetes treated?

No matter what type of diabetes you have, you’ll need to work closely with your doctor to keep it under control.


The main goal is to keep blood glucose levels within your target range. Your doctor will let you know what your target range should be. Targets vary with the type of diabetes, age, and presence of complications.


If you have gestational diabetes, your blood sugar targets will be lower than people with other types of diabetes.


Physical activity is an important part of diabetes management. Ask your doctor how many minutes per week you should devote to aerobic exercise. Diet is also crucial to good control. You’ll also need to monitor your blood pressure and cholesterol.


Treating type 1

All people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin to live because damage to the pancreas is permanent. There are different types of insulin available with different times of onset, peak, and duration.


Insulin is injected just under the skin. Your doctor will show you how to properly inject and rotate injection sites. You can also use an insulin pump, which is a device worn outside your body that can be programmed to release a specific dose. There are now continuous blood glucose monitors as well that check your sugar 24 hours a day.


You’ll need to monitor your blood sugar levels throughout the day. If necessary, you may also need to take medication to control cholesterol, high blood pressure, or other complications.


Treating type 2

Type 2 diabetes is managed with diet and exercise, and can also be treated with a variety of medications to help control blood sugar. The first-line medication is usually metformin (Glumetza, Glucophage, Fortamet, Riomet). This drug helps your body use insulin more effectively. If metformin doesn’t work, your doctor can add other medications or try something different.


You’ll need to monitor your blood sugar levels. You may also need medications to help control blood pressure and cholesterol.



Prevention

There’s no known prevention for type 1 diabetes.


You can lower your risk of type 2 diabetes if you:


control your weight and manage your diet

exercise regularly

avoid smoking, high triglycerides, and low HDL cholesterol levels

If you had gestational diabetes or have prediabetes, these habits can delay or prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.


Outlook

There’s no cure for type 1 diabetes. It requires lifelong disease management. But with consistent monitoring and adherence to treatment, you may be able to avoid more serious complications of the disease.


If you work closely with your doctor and make good lifestyle choices, type 2 diabetes can often be successfully managed.


If you have gestational diabetes, chances are it will resolve after your baby is born (though you do have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life).


ADVERTISEMENT

Check for diabetes from the privacy of your own home.

LetsGetChecked offers at-home HbA1c tests to help identify prediabetes or monitor diabetes after diagnosis. Order today for 30% off.


Last medically reviewed on June 28, 2018


 6 sourcescollapsed








Medically reviewed by Suzanne Falck, M.D., FACP — Written by Ann Pietrangelo — Updated on June 28, 2018



10 Ways to Treat Low Blood Sugar with Real Food


4 Easy Superfood Recipes to Fight Type 2 Diabetes


6 Brownie Recipes for People with Diabetes


5 Diabetes-Friendly — and Delicious — Waffle Recipes


10 Delicious Diabetic-Friendly Smoothies


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Yes

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Stress: How It Affects Diabetes and How to Decrease It

Types of stress

Glucose levels

Symptoms

Prevention

Coping

Takeaway

Stress and diabetes


Diabetes management is a lifelong process. This can add stress to your daily life. Stress can be a major barrier to effective glucose control. Stress hormones in your body may directly affect glucose levels. If you’re experiencing stress or feeling threatened, your body reacts. This is called the fight-or-flight response. This response elevates your hormone levels and causes your nerve cells to fire.


During this response, your body releases adrenaline and cortisol into your bloodstream and your respiratory rates increase. Your body directs blood to the muscles and limbs, allowing you to fight the situation. Your body may not be able to process the glucose released by your firing nerve cells if you have diabetes. If you can’t convert the glucose into energy, it builds up in the bloodstream. This causes your blood glucose levels to rise.


Constant stress from long-term problems with blood glucose can also wear you down mentally and physically. This may make managing your diabetes difficult.


How can different types of stress affect your diabetes?

Stress can affect people differently. The type of stress that you experience can also have an impact on your body’s physical response.


When people with type 2 diabetes are under mental stress, they generally experience an increase in their blood glucose levels. People with type 1 diabetes may have a more varied response. This means that they can experience either an increase or a decrease in their blood glucose levels.


When you’re under physical stress, your blood sugar can also increase. This can happen when you’re sick or injured. This can affect people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.


How can you determine if mental stress is affecting your glucose levels?

Keeping track of additional information, such as the date and what you were doing at the time you were stressed, may help you determine specific triggers. For example, are you more stressed on Monday mornings? If so, you know now to take special steps on Monday mornings to lower your stress and keep your glucose in check.


You can figure out if this is happening to you by capturing your stress and glucose levels. If you feel stressed, rate your level of mental stress on a scale from 1 to 10. Ten represents the highest level of stress. Write this number down.


After rating your stress, you should check your glucose levels. Continue doing this for the next couple of weeks. Before long, you may see a pattern emerge. If you notice that your glucose is regularly high, it’s likely that your mental stress is negatively affecting you blood sugar.



ADVERTISEMENT

Looking for diabetes-friendly meals?

Noom has you covered with customizable nutrition guidance. Discover how you can eat balanced and filling meals that keep your blood sugar in check.


What are the symptoms of stress?

Sometimes, the symptoms of stress are subtle and you may not notice them. Stress can take a toll on your mental and emotional well-being, and it can also impact your physical health. Recognizing the symptoms can help you identify stress and take steps to manage it.


If you’re stressed, you may experience:


headaches

muscle pain or tension

sleeping too much or too little

general feelings of illness

fatigue

If you’re stressed, you may feel:


unmotivated

irritable

depressed

restless

anxious

It’s also common for people who are stressed to engage in behavior that may be out of character. This includes:


withdrawing from friends and family

eating too much or too little

acting out in anger

drinking alcohol to excess

using tobacco

How to reduce your stress levels

It’s possible to lessen or limit the stressors in your life. Here are a few things that you can do to manage the effects of different forms of stress.


Reducing mental stress

Meditating can help remove negative thoughts and allow your mind to relax. Consider starting each morning with a 15-minute meditation. This will set the tone for the rest of your day.


Sit in a chair with your feet firmly planted on the floor and your eyes closed. Recite a mantra that makes sense to you, such as “I will have a good day” or “I feel at peace with the world.” Push away any other thoughts if they enter your head, and allow yourself to be present in the moment.


Reducing emotional stress

If you find yourself in an unwanted emotional state, take five minutes to be by yourself. Remove yourself from your current environment. Find a quiet space to focus on your breathing.


Put your hand on your belly, and feel it rise and fall. Inhale deep breaths, and exhale slowly and loudly. This will slow your heartbeat down, and help bring you back to a stable emotional state. This act of centering yourself may improve how you deal with whatever is causing the stress.


Reducing physical stress

Adding yoga to your daily routine can provide both physical activity and meditation at the same time. Practicing yoga can lower your blood pressure, too. Whether it’s yoga or another form of exercise, you should aim for 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise per day. You can do 10 minutes of exercise when you wake up, 10 minutes in the afternoon, and 10 minutes before you go to sleep.


Reducing family stress

If you’re feeling overwhelmed by family obligations, remember that it’s OK to say no. Your family will understand if you can’t make it to all events. If your stress stems from not seeing your family as often as you’d like, consider having a family fun night weekly or biweekly. You can play board games or participate in outdoor activities. This can include hiking, swimming, or signing up for a fun run together.


Reducing work stress

Stress issues at work can come home with you. Talk to your supervisor if you’re having a hard time at work. There may be options to alleviate or work through any issues you many be having.


If that doesn’t help, you may want to consider transferring to a different department or even finding new job altogether. Although stress levels elevate when looking for a new job, you may find it settles down with a different position better suited for your skills and personality.


HEALTHLINE RESOURCE

Nutritional diabetes guidance

Our weekly micro-lessons can empower you with wisdom you need to make healthy changes for your diabetes. Short and easy to follow tips for the week ahead.


Enter your email

Your privacy is important to us


How to cope with diabetes-related stress

If you’re feeling stressed about your condition, know that you aren’t alone. You can connect with people online or in your community for solidarity and support.


Online support groups

If you’re a Facebook user, consider liking this diabetes support group that offers helpful tips and a strong community to help you cope. Diabetic Connect is also an online resource dedicated to improving your quality of life. It provides articles, recipes, and informative videos.


In-person support groups

For women with diabetes, Diabetes Sisters offers nationwide meetups. The group started in North Carolina and expanded due to popularity. They now offer in-person groups throughout the country. These informal meetings are held on weeknights and typically last for one or two hours.


Defeat Diabetes Foundation provides a listing of peer support groups in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. You even search the directory and submit a listing of your own. The American Diabetes Association also offers local offices focused on education and community outreach.


Therapy

You may feel more comfortable talking with a professional about your stress. A therapist can provide coping mechanisms tailored to your individual situation and give you a safe environment to talk. They may also provide medical advice that online or in-person support groups can’t offer.



What you can do now

Although diabetes can present a different set of challenges, it’s possible to manage it effectively and lead a happy, healthy lifestyle. You can do this by adding short, meditative sessions or small workouts to your daily routine. You can also look into support groups and find one that best suits your personality and lifestyle needs. Being proactive can help ease the tension in your life.


Read this article in Spanish.


ADVERTISEMENT

Check for diabetes from the privacy of your own home.

LetsGetChecked offers at-home HbA1c tests to help identify prediabetes or monitor diabetes after diagnosis. Order today for 30% off.



What Are the Different Types of Diabetes?
Causes
Symptoms
Incidence
Complications
Treatment
Prevention
Outlook
What are the different types of diabetes?

Diabetes is a group of diseases in which the body doesn’t produce enough or any insulin, doesn’t properly use the insulin that is produced, or exhibits a combination of both. When any of these things happens, the body is unable to get sugar from the blood into the cells. That leads to high blood sugar levels.

Glucose, the form of sugar found in your blood, is one of your main energy sources. A lack of insulin or resistance to insulin causes sugar to build up in your blood. This can lead to many health problems.

The three main types of diabetes are:

type 1 diabetes
type 2 diabetes
gestational diabetes
What causes diabetes?
Type 1 diabetes
Type 1 diabetes is believed to be an autoimmune condition. This means your immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys the beta cells in your pancreas that produce insulin. The damage is permanent.

What prompts the attacks isn’t clear. There may be both genetic and environmental reasons. Lifestyle factors aren’t thought to play a role.

Type 2 diabetes
Type 2 diabetes starts as insulin resistance. This means your body can’t use insulin efficiently. That stimulates your pancreas to produce more insulin until it can no longer keep up with demand. Insulin production decreases, which leads to high blood sugar.

The exact cause of type 2 diabetes is unknown. Contributing factors may include:

genetics
lack of exercise
being overweight
There may also be other health factors and environmental reasons.

Gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes is due to insulin-blocking hormones produced during pregnancy. This type of diabetes only occurs during pregnancy.

What are the symptoms?
General symptoms of diabetes include:

excessive thirst and hunger
frequent urination
drowsiness or fatigue
dry, itchy skin
blurry vision
slow-healing wounds
Type 2 diabetes can cause dark patches in the folds of skin in your armpits and neck. Since type 2 diabetes often takes longer to diagnose, you may feel symptoms at the time of diagnosis, like pain or numbness in your feet.

Type 1 diabetes often develops more quickly and can cause symptoms like weight loss or a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when you have very high blood sugars, but little or no insulin in your body.

Symptoms of both types of diabetes can appear at any age, but generally type 1 occurs in children and young adults. Type 2 occurs in people over the age of 45. But younger people are increasingly being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes due to sedentary lifestyles and an increase in weight.


ADVERTISEMENT
Looking for diabetes-friendly meals?
Noom has you covered with customizable nutrition guidance. Discover how you can eat balanced and filling meals that keep your blood sugar in check.

How common is diabetes?
About 30.3 millionTrusted Source people in the United States have diabetes. About 5 to 10Trusted Source percent have type 1 diabetes, while 90 to 95 percent have type 2 diabetes.

The latest figures show that 1.5 million adultsTrusted Source were newly diagnosed in 2015. Another 84.1 million are thought to have prediabetes. But most people with prediabetes don’t know they have the condition.

Prediabetes occurs when your blood glucose is higher than it should be, but not high enough to be diabetes.

You’re more likely to develop diabetes if you have a family history of the disease.

Other risk factors for type 2 diabetes include:

having a sedentary lifestyle
being overweight
having had gestational diabetes or prediabetes
ADVERTISING


What are the potential complications?
Complications of diabetes generally develop over time. Having poorly controlled blood sugar levels increases the risk of serious complications that can become life-threatening. Chronic complications include:

vessel disease, leading to heart attack or stroke
eye problems, called retinopathy
infection or skin conditions
nerve damage, or neuropathy
kidney damage, or nephropathy
amputations due to neuropathy or vessel disease
Type 2 diabetes may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, especially if your blood sugar is not well controlled.

Complications in pregnancy
High blood sugar levels during pregnancy can harm mother and child, increasing the risk of:

high blood pressure
preeclampsia
miscarriage or stillbirth
birth defects
HEALTHLINE RESOURCE
Nutritional diabetes guidance
Our weekly micro-lessons can empower you with wisdom you need to make healthy changes for your diabetes. Short and easy to follow tips for the week ahead.

Enter your email
Your privacy is important to us

How are different types of diabetes treated?
No matter what type of diabetes you have, you’ll need to work closely with your doctor to keep it under control.

The main goal is to keep blood glucose levels within your target range. Your doctor will let you know what your target range should be. Targets vary with the type of diabetes, age, and presence of complications.

If you have gestational diabetes, your blood sugar targets will be lower than people with other types of diabetes.

Physical activity is an important part of diabetes management. Ask your doctor how many minutes per week you should devote to aerobic exercise. Diet is also crucial to good control. You’ll also need to monitor your blood pressure and cholesterol.

Treating type 1
All people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin to live because damage to the pancreas is permanent. There are different types of insulin available with different times of onset, peak, and duration.

Insulin is injected just under the skin. Your doctor will show you how to properly inject and rotate injection sites. You can also use an insulin pump, which is a device worn outside your body that can be programmed to release a specific dose. There are now continuous blood glucose monitors as well that check your sugar 24 hours a day.

You’ll need to monitor your blood sugar levels throughout the day. If necessary, you may also need to take medication to control cholesterol, high blood pressure, or other complications.

Treating type 2
Type 2 diabetes is managed with diet and exercise, and can also be treated with a variety of medications to help control blood sugar. The first-line medication is usually metformin (Glumetza, Glucophage, Fortamet, Riomet). This drug helps your body use insulin more effectively. If metformin doesn’t work, your doctor can add other medications or try something different.

You’ll need to monitor your blood sugar levels. You may also need medications to help control blood pressure and cholesterol.


Prevention
There’s no known prevention for type 1 diabetes.

You can lower your risk of type 2 diabetes if you:

control your weight and manage your diet
exercise regularly
avoid smoking, high triglycerides, and low HDL cholesterol levels
If you had gestational diabetes or have prediabetes, these habits can delay or prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.

Outlook
There’s no cure for type 1 diabetes. It requires lifelong disease management. But with consistent monitoring and adherence to treatment, you may be able to avoid more serious complications of the disease.

If you work closely with your doctor and make good lifestyle choices, type 2 diabetes can often be successfully managed.

If you have gestational diabetes, chances are it will resolve after your baby is born (though you do have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life).

ADVERTISEMENT
Check for diabetes from the privacy of your own home.
LetsGetChecked offers at-home HbA1c tests to help identify prediabetes or monitor diabetes after diagnosis. Order today for 30% off.

Last medically reviewed on June 28, 2018

 6 sourcescollapsed







Medically reviewed by Suzanne Falck, M.D., FACP — Written by Ann Pietrangelo — Updated on June 28, 2018


10 Ways to Treat Low Blood Sugar with Real Food

4 Easy Superfood Recipes to Fight Type 2 Diabetes

6 Brownie Recipes for People with Diabetes

5 Diabetes-Friendly — and Delicious — Waffle Recipes

10 Delicious Diabetic-Friendly Smoothies

Was this article helpful?
Yes
No


Stress: How It Affects Diabetes and How to Decrease It
Types of stress
Glucose levels
Symptoms
Prevention
Coping
Takeaway
Stress and diabetes

Diabetes management is a lifelong process. This can add stress to your daily life. Stress can be a major barrier to effective glucose control. Stress hormones in your body may directly affect glucose levels. If you’re experiencing stress or feeling threatened, your body reacts. This is called the fight-or-flight response. This response elevates your hormone levels and causes your nerve cells to fire.

During this response, your body releases adrenaline and cortisol into your bloodstream and your respiratory rates increase. Your body directs blood to the muscles and limbs, allowing you to fight the situation. Your body may not be able to process the glucose released by your firing nerve cells if you have diabetes. If you can’t convert the glucose into energy, it builds up in the bloodstream. This causes your blood glucose levels to rise.

Constant stress from long-term problems with blood glucose can also wear you down mentally and physically. This may make managing your diabetes difficult.

How can different types of stress affect your diabetes?
Stress can affect people differently. The type of stress that you experience can also have an impact on your body’s physical response.

When people with type 2 diabetes are under mental stress, they generally experience an increase in their blood glucose levels. People with type 1 diabetes may have a more varied response. This means that they can experience either an increase or a decrease in their blood glucose levels.

When you’re under physical stress, your blood sugar can also increase. This can happen when you’re sick or injured. This can affect people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

How can you determine if mental stress is affecting your glucose levels?
Keeping track of additional information, such as the date and what you were doing at the time you were stressed, may help you determine specific triggers. For example, are you more stressed on Monday mornings? If so, you know now to take special steps on Monday mornings to lower your stress and keep your glucose in check.

You can figure out if this is happening to you by capturing your stress and glucose levels. If you feel stressed, rate your level of mental stress on a scale from 1 to 10. Ten represents the highest level of stress. Write this number down.

After rating your stress, you should check your glucose levels. Continue doing this for the next couple of weeks. Before long, you may see a pattern emerge. If you notice that your glucose is regularly high, it’s likely that your mental stress is negatively affecting you blood sugar.


ADVERTISEMENT
Looking for diabetes-friendly meals?
Noom has you covered with customizable nutrition guidance. Discover how you can eat balanced and filling meals that keep your blood sugar in check.

What are the symptoms of stress?
Sometimes, the symptoms of stress are subtle and you may not notice them. Stress can take a toll on your mental and emotional well-being, and it can also impact your physical health. Recognizing the symptoms can help you identify stress and take steps to manage it.

If you’re stressed, you may experience:

headaches
muscle pain or tension
sleeping too much or too little
general feelings of illness
fatigue
If you’re stressed, you may feel:

unmotivated
irritable
depressed
restless
anxious
It’s also common for people who are stressed to engage in behavior that may be out of character. This includes:

withdrawing from friends and family
eating too much or too little
acting out in anger
drinking alcohol to excess
using tobacco
How to reduce your stress levels
It’s possible to lessen or limit the stressors in your life. Here are a few things that you can do to manage the effects of different forms of stress.

Reducing mental stress
Meditating can help remove negative thoughts and allow your mind to relax. Consider starting each morning with a 15-minute meditation. This will set the tone for the rest of your day.

Sit in a chair with your feet firmly planted on the floor and your eyes closed. Recite a mantra that makes sense to you, such as “I will have a good day” or “I feel at peace with the world.” Push away any other thoughts if they enter your head, and allow yourself to be present in the moment.

Reducing emotional stress
If you find yourself in an unwanted emotional state, take five minutes to be by yourself. Remove yourself from your current environment. Find a quiet space to focus on your breathing.

Put your hand on your belly, and feel it rise and fall. Inhale deep breaths, and exhale slowly and loudly. This will slow your heartbeat down, and help bring you back to a stable emotional state. This act of centering yourself may improve how you deal with whatever is causing the stress.

Reducing physical stress
Adding yoga to your daily routine can provide both physical activity and meditation at the same time. Practicing yoga can lower your blood pressure, too. Whether it’s yoga or another form of exercise, you should aim for 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise per day. You can do 10 minutes of exercise when you wake up, 10 minutes in the afternoon, and 10 minutes before you go to sleep.

Reducing family stress
If you’re feeling overwhelmed by family obligations, remember that it’s OK to say no. Your family will understand if you can’t make it to all events. If your stress stems from not seeing your family as often as you’d like, consider having a family fun night weekly or biweekly. You can play board games or participate in outdoor activities. This can include hiking, swimming, or signing up for a fun run together.

Reducing work stress
Stress issues at work can come home with you. Talk to your supervisor if you’re having a hard time at work. There may be options to alleviate or work through any issues you many be having.

If that doesn’t help, you may want to consider transferring to a different department or even finding new job altogether. Although stress levels elevate when looking for a new job, you may find it settles down with a different position better suited for your skills and personality.

HEALTHLINE RESOURCE
Nutritional diabetes guidance
Our weekly micro-lessons can empower you with wisdom you need to make healthy changes for your diabetes. Short and easy to follow tips for the week ahead.

Enter your email
Your privacy is important to us

How to cope with diabetes-related stress
If you’re feeling stressed about your condition, know that you aren’t alone. You can connect with people online or in your community for solidarity and support.

Online support groups
If you’re a Facebook user, consider liking this diabetes support group that offers helpful tips and a strong community to help you cope. Diabetic Connect is also an online resource dedicated to improving your quality of life. It provides articles, recipes, and informative videos.

In-person support groups
For women with diabetes, Diabetes Sisters offers nationwide meetups. The group started in North Carolina and expanded due to popularity. They now offer in-person groups throughout the country. These informal meetings are held on weeknights and typically last for one or two hours.

Defeat Diabetes Foundation provides a listing of peer support groups in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. You even search the directory and submit a listing of your own. The American Diabetes Association also offers local offices focused on education and community outreach.

Therapy
You may feel more comfortable talking with a professional about your stress. A therapist can provide coping mechanisms tailored to your individual situation and give you a safe environment to talk. They may also provide medical advice that online or in-person support groups can’t offer.


What you can do now
Although diabetes can present a different set of challenges, it’s possible to manage it effectively and lead a happy, healthy lifestyle. You can do this by adding short, meditative sessions or small workouts to your daily routine. You can also look into support groups and find one that best suits your personality and lifestyle needs. Being proactive can help ease the tension in your life.

Read this article in Spanish.

ADVERTISEMENT
Check for diabetes from the privacy of your own home.
LetsGetChecked offers at-home HbA1c tests to help identify prediabetes or monitor diabetes after diagnosis. Order today for 30% off.